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Proceedings Article

Head-controlled assistive telerobot with extended physiological proprioception capability

[+] Author Affiliations
Marcos Salganicoff, Tariq Rahman, Ricardo Mahoney, D. Pino, Vijay Jayachandran, Shoupu Chen, William S. Harwin

Univ. of Delaware and A. I. duPont Institute (USA)

Vijay Kumar

Univ. of Pennsylvania (USA)

Proc. SPIE 2590, Telemanipulator and Telepresence Technologies II, 108 (December 1, 1995); doi:10.1117/12.227935
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From Conference Volume 2590

  • Telemanipulator and Telepresence Technologies II
  • Marcos Salganicoff
  • Philadelphia, PA | October 22, 1995

abstract

People with disabilities such as quadriplegia can use mouth-sticks and head-sticks as extension devices to perform desired manipulations. These extensions provide extended proprioception which allows users to directly feel forces and other perceptual cues such as texture present at the tip of the mouth-stick. Such devices are effective for two principle reasons: because of their close contact with the user's tactile and proprioceptive sensing abilities; and because they tend to be lightweight and very stiff, and can thus convey tactile and kinesthetic information with high-bandwidth. Unfortunately, traditional mouth-sticks and head-sticks are limited in workspace and in the mechanical power that can be transferred because of user mobility and strength limitations. We describe an alternative implementation of the head-stick device using the idea of a virtual head-stick: a head-controlled bilateral force-reflecting telerobot. In this system the end-effector of the slave robot moves as if it were at the tip of an imaginary extension of the user's head. The design goal is for the system is to have the same intuitive operation and extended proprioception as a regular mouth-stick effector but with augmentation of workspace volume and mechanical power. The input is through a specially modified six DOF master robot (a PerForceTM hand-controller) whose joints can be back-driven to apply forces at the user's head. The manipulation tasks in the environment are performed by a six degree-of-freedom slave robot (the Zebra-ZEROTM) with a built-in force sensor. We describe the prototype hardware/software implementation of the system, control system design, safety/disability issues, and initial evaluation tasks.

© (1995) COPYRIGHT SPIE--The International Society for Optical Engineering. Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Citation

Marcos Salganicoff ; Tariq Rahman ; Ricardo Mahoney ; D. Pino ; Vijay Jayachandran, et al.
"Head-controlled assistive telerobot with extended physiological proprioception capability", Proc. SPIE 2590, Telemanipulator and Telepresence Technologies II, 108 (December 1, 1995); doi:10.1117/12.227935; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.227935


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