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Proceedings Article

Packaging of photonic devices using laser welding

[+] Author Affiliations
Soon Jang

Newport Corp. (USA)

Proc. SPIE 2610, Laser Diode Chip and Packaging Technology, 138 (January 15, 1996); doi:10.1117/12.230077
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From Conference Volume 2610

  • Laser Diode Chip and Packaging Technology
  • Pei C. Chen; Tomas D. Milster
  • Philadelphia, PA | October 22, 1995

abstract

Pulsed laser welding has proven to be the preferred bonding method that best facilitates the automated fiber alignment and bonding process of optoelectronic devices. However, a combination of considerations regarding (1) the high capital investment for a laser welding workstation (LWWS), (2) acquiring and developing the packaging technology for laser welding, and (3) the undeveloped demand in the market place have caused hesitation by many manufacturers in adopting the process. Typically, the majority of packages manufactured with laser welding have been higher-end priced devices. Further understanding and improvement of technical challenges, such as 'post-weld-shift' control, material selection, and package design, along with development of a cost-effective semi-automated LWWS are presenting a greater opportunity for a broader range of packages to be designed for laser welding, especially for low-cost singlemode datacom packages. The focus of the current work is to design a broad range of OE packages and develop a nanometer precision automation process for laser welding technology. The solution is recognized to be the combination of understanding the laser welding process, designing packages for laser welding, and developing an automation capability for manufacturing.

© (1996) COPYRIGHT SPIE--The International Society for Optical Engineering. Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Citation

Soon Jang
"Packaging of photonic devices using laser welding", Proc. SPIE 2610, Laser Diode Chip and Packaging Technology, 138 (January 15, 1996); doi:10.1117/12.230077; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.230077


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