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Proceedings Article

Milk phospholipid's protective effects against UV damage in skin equivalent models

[+] Author Affiliations
Carl Dargitz, Ashley Russell, Michael Bingham, Zyra Achay, Rafael Jimenez-Flores, Lily H. Laiho

California Polytechnic State Univ. (USA)

Proc. SPIE 8225, Imaging, Manipulation, and Analysis of Biomolecules, Cells, and Tissues X, 82251V (February 9, 2012); doi:10.1117/12.907128
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From Conference Volume 8225

  • Imaging, Manipulation, and Analysis of Biomolecules, Cells, and Tissues X
  • Daniel L. Farkas; Dan V. Nicolau; Robert C. Leif
  • San Francisco, California, USA | January 21, 2012

abstract

Exposure of skin tissue to UV radiation has been shown to cause DNA photodamage. If this damaged DNA is allowed to replicate, carcinogenesis may occur. DNA damage is prevented from being passed on to daughter cells by upregulation of the protein p21. p21 halts the cells cycle allowing the cell to undergo apoptosis, or repair its DNA before replication. Previous work suggested that milk phospholipids may possess protective properties against UV damage. In this study, we observed cell morphology, cell apoptosis, and p21 expression in tissue engineered epidermis through the use of Hematoxylin and Eosin staining, confocal microscopy, and western blot respectively. Tissues were divided into four treatment groups including: a control group with no UV and no milk phospholipid treatment, a group exposed to UV alone, a group incubated with milk phospholipids alone, and a group treated with milk phospholipids and UV. All groups were incubated for twenty-four hours after treatment. Tissues were then fixed, processed, and embedded in paraffin. Performing western blots resulted in visible p21 bands for the UV group only, implying that in every other group, p21 expression was lesser. Numbers of apoptotic cells were determined by observing the tissues treated with Hoechst dye under a confocal microscope, and counting the number of apoptotic and total cells to obtain a percentage of apoptotic cells. We found a decrease in apoptotic cells in tissues treated with milk phospholipids and UV compared to tissues exposed to UV alone. Collectively, these results suggest that milk phospholipids protect cell DNA from damage incurred from UV light.

© (2012) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Citation

Carl Dargitz ; Ashley Russell ; Michael Bingham ; Zyra Achay ; Rafael Jimenez-Flores, et al.
"Milk phospholipid's protective effects against UV damage in skin equivalent models", Proc. SPIE 8225, Imaging, Manipulation, and Analysis of Biomolecules, Cells, and Tissues X, 82251V (February 9, 2012); doi:10.1117/12.907128; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.907128


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