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Proceedings Article

Cylindrical millimeter-wave imaging technique and applications

[+] Author Affiliations
David M. Sheen, Douglas L. McMakin, Thomas E. Hall

Pacific Northwest National Lab.

Proc. SPIE 6211, Passive Millimeter-Wave Imaging Technology IX, 62110A (May 05, 2006); doi:10.1117/12.668572
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From Conference Volume 6211

  • Passive Millimeter-Wave Imaging Technology IX
  • Roger Appleby; David A. Wikner
  • Orlando (Kissimmee), FL | April 17, 2006

abstract

The wideband microwave or millimeter-wave cylindrical imaging technique has been developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for several applications including concealed weapon detection and automated body measurement for apparel fitting. This technique forms a fully-focused, diffraction-limited, three-dimensional image of the person or imaging target by scanning an inward-directed vertical array around the person or imaging target. The array is switched electronically to sequence across the array at high-speed, so that a full 360 degree mechanical scan over the cylindrical aperture can occur in 2-10 seconds. Wideband, coherent reflection data from each antenna position are recorded in a computer and subsequently reconstructed using an FFT-based image reconstruction algorithm developed at PNNL. The cylindrical scanning configuration is designed to optimize the illumination of the target and minimize non-returns due to specular reflection of the illumination away from the array. In this paper, simulated modeling data are used to explore imaging issues that affect the cylindrical imaging technique. Physical optics scattering simulations are used to model realistic returns from curved surfaces to determine the extent to which specular reflection affects the signal return and subsequent image reconstruction from these surfaces. This is a particularly important issue for the body measurement application. Also, an artifact in the imaging technique, referred to as "circular convolution aliasing" is discussed including methods to reduce or eliminate it. Numerous simulated and laboratory measured imaging results are presented.

© (2006) COPYRIGHT SPIE--The International Society for Optical Engineering. Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Citation

David M. Sheen ; Douglas L. McMakin and Thomas E. Hall
"Cylindrical millimeter-wave imaging technique and applications", Proc. SPIE 6211, Passive Millimeter-Wave Imaging Technology IX, 62110A (May 05, 2006); doi:10.1117/12.668572; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.668572


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