Full Content is available to subscribers

Subscribe/Learn More  >
Proceedings Article

Comparison of roughness measurement with atomic force microscopy and interference microscopy

[+] Author Affiliations
Anders Kuhle, Joergen Garnaes

Danish Fundamental Metrology (Denmark)

Bengt-Goran Rosen

Toponova AB (Sweden)

Proc. SPIE 5188, Advanced Characterization Techniques for Optics, Semiconductors, and Nanotechnologies, 154 (November 7, 2003); doi:10.1117/12.521309
Text Size: A A A
From Conference Volume 5188

  • Advanced Characterization Techniques for Optics, Semiconductors, and Nanotechnologies
  • Angela Duparre; Bhanwar Singh
  • San Diego, California, USA | August 03, 2003

abstract

Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and interference microscopy are two methods often used to measure roughness, but the probe size is very different and they respond to different physical properties (hardness and reflectivity). In earlier work we have shown that the limited resolution of interference microscopy can be approximated by the longwave components of a Gaussian filtering of the AFM image with a cut-off wavelength λc a little larger than the wavelength of light. This description was valid for smooth and hard surfaces with good reflectivity such as polished metal surfaces (Rq < 10 nm). In this paper we extent the analysis to directly measure the effective cut-off wavelength λc = 2600 nm for a particular interference microscope based on the profiles of grooves with a period of 3000 nm, a depth of (104 ± 1) nm and vertical sidewalls. To validate the measured parameter λc, the same area on a polished hip joint prosthesis was measured by both an AFM and the particular interference microscope. Without a Gaussian filtering of the AFM image the appearance and calculated roughness of the images were significantly different (Ra = 1.7 nm, Rq = 2.2 nm versus Ra = 1.0 nm, Rq = 1.2 nm). However, using the measured cut-off wavelength the visual appearance of the longwave components of the AFM image and the interference microscope image are almost identical and the calculated roughness is equal. This strongly suggests that an effective cut-off wavelength can be measured and used to give consistency between the different methods in the range where they overlap.

© (2003) COPYRIGHT SPIE--The International Society for Optical Engineering. Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Citation

Anders Kuhle ; Bengt-Goran Rosen and Joergen Garnaes
"Comparison of roughness measurement with atomic force microscopy and interference microscopy", Proc. SPIE 5188, Advanced Characterization Techniques for Optics, Semiconductors, and Nanotechnologies, 154 (November 7, 2003); doi:10.1117/12.521309; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.521309


Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this proceeding ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).

Figures

Tables

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this proceeding ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.