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Proceedings Article

Characterizing the potential of MEMS deformable mirrors for astronomical adaptive optics

[+] Author Affiliations
Katie M. Morzinski, Scott Severson, Daren Dillon, Don Gavel, Claire Max

National Science Foundation Ctr. for Adaptive Optics and UCO/Lick Observatory, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz

Julia W. Evans

National Science Foundation Ctr. for Adaptive Optics and Lawrence Livermore National Lab. and Univ. of California, Davis

Bruce Macintosh

National Science Foundation Ctr. for Adaptive Optics and UCO/Lick Observatory, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz and Lawrence Livermore National Lab.

Dave Palmer

National Science Foundation Ctr. for Adaptive Optics and Lawrence Livermore National Lab.

Proc. SPIE 6272, Advances in Adaptive Optics II, 627221 (June 28, 2006); doi:10.1117/12.672470
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From Conference Volume 6272

  • Advances in Adaptive Optics II
  • Orlando, Florida , USA | May 24, 2006

abstract

Current high-contrast "extreme" adaptive optics (ExAO) systems are partially limited by deformable mirror technology. Mirror requirements specify thousands of actuators, all of which must be functional within the clear aperture, and which give nanometer flatness yet micron stroke when operated in closed loop.1 Micro-electrical mechanical-systems (MEMS) deformable mirrors have been shown to meet ExAO actuator yield, wavefront error, and cost considerations. This study presents the performance of Boston Micromachines' 1024-actuator continuous-facesheet MEMS deformable mirrors under tests for actuator stability, position repeatability, and practical operating stroke. To explore whether MEMS actuators are susceptible to temporal variation, a series of long-term stability experiments were conducted. Each actuator was held fixed and the motion over 40 minutes was measured. The median displacement of all the actuators tested was 0.08 nm surface, inclusive of system error. MEMS devices are also appealing for adaptive optics architectures based on open-loop correction. In experiments of actuator position repeatability, 100% of the tested actuators returned repeatedly to their starting point with a precision of < 1 nm surface. Finally, MEMS devices were tested for maximum stroke achieved under application of spatially varying one-dimensional sinusoids. Given a specified amplitude in voltage, the measured stroke was 1 μm surface at the low spatial frequencies, decreasing to 0.2 μm surface for the highest spatial frequency. Stroke varied somewhat linearly as inverse spatial frequency, with a flattening in the relation at the high spatial frequency end.

© (2006) COPYRIGHT SPIE--The International Society for Optical Engineering. Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Citation

Katie M. Morzinski ; Julia W. Evans ; Scott Severson ; Bruce Macintosh ; Daren Dillon, et al.
"Characterizing the potential of MEMS deformable mirrors for astronomical adaptive optics", Proc. SPIE 6272, Advances in Adaptive Optics II, 627221 (June 28, 2006); doi:10.1117/12.672470; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.672470


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