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Proceedings Article

LOTIS at completion of Collimator integration

[+] Author Affiliations
R. M. Bell, G. C. Robins, C. Eugeni, G. Cuzner, S. B. Hutchison

Lockheed Martin Space Systems Co. (USA)

S. H. Baily, B. Ceurden, J. Hagen, K. Kenagy, H. M. Martin, M. Tuell, M. Ward, S. C. West

Steward Observatory, University of Arizona (USA)

Proc. SPIE 7017, Modeling, Systems Engineering, and Project Management for Astronomy III, 70170D (July 07, 2008); doi:10.1117/12.791889
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From Conference Volume 7017

  • Modeling, Systems Engineering, and Project Management for Astronomy III
  • George Z. Angeli; Martin J. Cullum
  • Marseille, France | June 23, 2008

abstract

The Large Optical Test and Integration Site (LOTIS) at the Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company in Sunnyvale, CA is designed for the verification and testing of optical systems. The facility consists of a large, temperature stabilized vacuum chamber that also functions as a class 10k cleanroom. Within this chamber and atop an advanced vibration-isolation bench are the 6.5 meter diameter LOTIS Collimator and Scene Generator, LOTIS alignment and support equipment. The optical payloads are also placed on the vibration bench in the chamber for testing. The Scene Generator is attached to the Collimator forming the Scene Projection System (SPS) and this system is designed to operate in both air and vacuum, providing test imagery in an adaptable suite of visible/near infrared (VNIR) and midwave infrared (MWIR) point sources, and combined bandwidth visible-through-MWIR point sources, for testing of large aperture optical payloads. The heart of the SPS is the LOTIS Collimator, a 6.5m f/15 telescope, which projects scenes with wavefront errors <85 nm rms out to a ±0.75 mrad field of view (FOV). Using field lenses, performance can be extended to a maximum field of view of ±3.2 mrad. The LOTIS Collimator incorporates an extensive integrated wavefront sensing and control system to verify the performance of the system, and to optimize its actively controlled primary mirror surface and overall alignment. Using these optical test assets allows both integrated component and system level optical testing of electro-optical (EO) devices by providing realistic scene content. LOTIS is scheduled to achieve initial operational capability in 2008.

© (2008) COPYRIGHT SPIE--The International Society for Optical Engineering. Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Citation

R. M. Bell ; G. C. Robins ; C. Eugeni ; G. Cuzner ; S. B. Hutchison, et al.
"LOTIS at completion of Collimator integration", Proc. SPIE 7017, Modeling, Systems Engineering, and Project Management for Astronomy III, 70170D (July 07, 2008); doi:10.1117/12.791889; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.791889


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