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Proceedings Article

Ultra-miniature wireless temperature sensor for thermal medicine applications

[+] Author Affiliations
Ahmad Khairi, Shih-Chang Hung, Jeyanandh Paramesh, Gary Fedder, Yoed Rabin

Carnegie Mellon Univ. (USA)

Proc. SPIE 7901, Energy-based Treatment of Tissue and Assessment VI, 79010T (February 22, 2011); doi:10.1117/12.874729
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From Conference Volume 7901

  • Energy-based Treatment of Tissue and Assessment VI
  • Thomas P. Ryan
  • San Francisco, California, USA | January 22, 2011

abstract

This study presents a prototype design of an ultra-miniature, wireless, battery-less, and implantable temperature-sensor, with applications to thermal medicine such as cryosurgery, hyperthermia, and thermal ablation. The design aims at a sensory device smaller than 1.5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in length, to enable minimally invasive deployment through a hypodermic needle. While the new device may be used for local temperature monitoring, simultaneous data collection from an array of such sensors can be used to reconstruct the 3D temperature field in the treated area, offering a unique capability in thermal medicine. The new sensory device consists of three major subsystems: a temperature-sensing core, a wireless data-communication unit, and a wireless power reception and management unit. Power is delivered wirelessly to the implant from an external source using an inductive link. To meet size requirements while enhancing reliability and minimizing cost, the implant is fully integrated in a regular foundry CMOS technology (0.15 μm in the current study), including the implant-side inductor of the power link. A temperature-sensing core that consists of a proportional-to-absolute-temperature (PTAT) circuit has been designed and characterized. It employs a microwatt chopper stabilized op-amp and dynamic element-matched current sources to achieve high absolute accuracy. A second order sigma-delta (Σ-Δ) analog-to-digital converter (ADC) is designed to convert the temperature reading to a digital code, which is transmitted by backscatter through the same antenna used for receiving power. A high-efficiency multi-stage differential CMOS rectifier has been designed to provide a DC supply to the sensing and communication subsystems. This paper focuses on the development of the all-CMOS temperature sensing core circuitry part of the device, and briefly reviews the wireless power delivery and communication subsystems.

© (2011) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Citation

Ahmad Khairi ; Shih-Chang Hung ; Jeyanandh Paramesh ; Gary Fedder and Yoed Rabin
"Ultra-miniature wireless temperature sensor for thermal medicine applications", Proc. SPIE 7901, Energy-based Treatment of Tissue and Assessment VI, 79010T (February 22, 2011); doi:10.1117/12.874729; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.874729


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