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Proceedings Article

Laser-assisted development of titanium alloys: the search for new biomedical materials

[+] Author Affiliations
Amelia Almeida, Dheeraj Gupta, Rui Vilar

Technical Univ. of Lisboa (Portugal)

Proc. SPIE 7994, LAT 2010: International Conference on Lasers, Applications, and Technologies, 79941U (February 16, 2011); doi:10.1117/12.881279
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From Conference Volume 7994

  • LAT 2010: International Conference on Lasers, Applications, and Technologies
  • Vladislav Panchenko; Gérard Mourou; Aleksei M. Zheltikov
  • Kazan, Russian Federation | August 23, 2010

abstract

Ti-alloys used in prosthetic applications are mostly alloys initially developed for aeronautical applications, so their behavior was not optimized for medical use. A need remains to design new alloys for biomedical applications, where requirements such as biocompatibility, in-body durability, specific manufacturing ability, and cost effectiveness are considered. Materials for this application must present excellent biocompatibility, ductility, toughness and wear and corrosion resistance, a large laser processing window and low sensitivity to changes in the processing parameters. Laser deposition has been investigated in order to access its applicability to laser based manufactured implants. In this study, variable powder feed rate laser cladding has been used as a method for the combinatorial investigation of new alloy systems that offers a unique possibility for the rapid and exhaustive preparation of a whole range of alloys with compositions variable along a single clad track. This method was used as to produce composition gradient Ti-Mo alloys. Mo has been used since it is among the few elements biocompatible, non-toxic β-Ti phase stabilizers. Alloy tracks with compositions in the range 0-19 wt.%Mo were produced and characterized in detail as a function of composition using microscale testing procedures for screening of compositions with promising properties. Microstructural analysis showed that alloys with Mo content above 8% are fully formed of β phase grains. However, these β grains present a cellular substructure that is associated to a Ti and Mo segregation pattern that occurs during solidification. Ultramicroindentation tests carried out to evaluate the alloys' hardness and Young's modulus showed that Ti-13%Mo alloys presented the lowest hardness and Young's modulus (70 GPa) closer to that of bone than common Ti alloys, thus showing great potential for implant applications.

© (2010) COPYRIGHT SPIE--The International Society for Optical Engineering. Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Citation

Amelia Almeida ; Dheeraj Gupta and Rui Vilar
"Laser-assisted development of titanium alloys: the search for new biomedical materials", Proc. SPIE 7994, LAT 2010: International Conference on Lasers, Applications, and Technologies, 79941U (February 16, 2011); doi:10.1117/12.881279; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.881279


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