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Proceedings Article

Lightweight autonomous chemical identification system (LACIS)

[+] Author Affiliations
George Lozos

Smiths Detection (United States)

Hai Lin, Timothy Burch

Intelligent Optical Systems, Inc. (United States)

Proc. SPIE 8358, Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) Sensing XIII, 83581E (May 1, 2012); doi:10.1117/12.919466
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From Conference Volume 8358

  • Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) Sensing XIII
  • Augustus W. Fountain
  • Baltimore, Maryland, USA | April 23, 2012

abstract

Smiths Detection and Intelligent Optical Systems have developed prototypes for the Lightweight Autonomous Chemical Identification System (LACIS) for the US Department of Homeland Security. LACIS is to be a handheld detection system for Chemical Warfare Agents (CWAs) and Toxic Industrial Chemicals (TICs). LACIS is designed to have a low limit of detection and rapid response time for use by emergency responders and could allow determination of areas having dangerous concentration levels and if protective garments will be required. Procedures for protection of responders from hazardous materials incidents require the use of protective equipment until such time as the hazard can be assessed. Such accurate analysis can accelerate operations and increase effectiveness. LACIS is to be an improved point detector employing novel CBRNE detection modalities that includes a militaryproven ruggedized ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) with an array of electro-resistive sensors to extend the range of chemical threats detected in a single device. It uses a novel sensor data fusion and threat classification architecture to interpret the independent sensor responses and provide robust detection at low levels in complex backgrounds with minimal false alarms. The performance of LACIS prototypes have been characterized in independent third party laboratory tests at the Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI, Columbus, OH) and indoor and outdoor field tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). LACIS prototypes will be entering operational assessment by key government emergency response groups to determine its capabilities versus requirements.© (2012) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Citation

George Lozos ; Hai Lin and Timothy Burch
"Lightweight autonomous chemical identification system (LACIS)", Proc. SPIE 8358, Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE) Sensing XIII, 83581E (May 1, 2012); doi:10.1117/12.919466; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.919466


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