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Proceedings Article

Validation of ALFIA: a platform for quantifying near-infrared fluorescent images of lymphatic propulsion in humans

[+] Author Affiliations
John C. Rasmussen, Merrick Bautista, I-Chih Tan, Kristen E. Adams, Melissa Aldrich, Milton V. Marshall, Eva M. Sevick-Muraca

The Univ. of Texas Health Science Ctr. at Houston (USA)

Caroline E. Fife, Erik A. Maus, Latisha A. Smith

The Univ. of Texas Health Science Ctr. at Houston (USA) and Memorial Hermann Hospital (USA)

Jingdan Zhang, Xiaoyan Xiang, Shaohua Kevin Zhou

Siemens Corporate Research (USA)

Proc. SPIE 7902, Imaging, Manipulation, and Analysis of Biomolecules, Cells, and Tissues IX, 79021K (February 10, 2011); doi:10.1117/12.875511
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From Conference Volume 7902

  • Imaging, Manipulation, and Analysis of Biomolecules, Cells, and Tissues IX
  • Daniel L. Farkas; Dan V. Nicolau; Robert C. Leif
  • San Francisco, California, USA | January 22, 2011

abstract

Recently, we demonstrated near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging for quantifying real-time lymphatic propulsion in humans following intradermal injections of microdose amounts of indocyanine green. However computational methods for image analysis are underdeveloped, hindering the translation and clinical adaptation of NIR fluorescent lymphatic imaging. In our initial work we used ImageJ and custom MatLab programs to manually identify lymphatic vessels and individual propulsion events using the temporal transit of the fluorescent dye. In addition, we extracted the apparent velocities of contractile propagation and time periods between propulsion events. Extensive time and effort were required to analyze the 6-8 gigabytes of NIR fluorescent images obtained for each subject. To alleviate this bottleneck, we commenced development of ALFIA, an integrated software platform which will permit automated, near real-time analysis of lymphatic function using NIR fluorescent imaging. However, prior to automation, the base algorithms calculating the apparent velocity and period must be validated to verify that they produce results consistent with the proof-of-concept programs. To do this, both methods were used to analyze NIR fluorescent images of two subjects and the number of propulsive events identified, the average apparent velocities, and the average periods for each subject were compared. Paired Student's t-tests indicate that the differences between their average results are not significant. With the base algorithms validated, further development and automation of ALFIA can be realized, significantly reducing the amount of user interaction required, and potentially enabling the near real-time, clinical evaluation of NIR fluorescent lymphatic imaging.

© (2011) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Citation

John C. Rasmussen ; Merrick Bautista ; I-Chih Tan ; Kristen E. Adams ; Melissa Aldrich, et al.
"Validation of ALFIA: a platform for quantifying near-infrared fluorescent images of lymphatic propulsion in humans", Proc. SPIE 7902, Imaging, Manipulation, and Analysis of Biomolecules, Cells, and Tissues IX, 79021K (February 10, 2011); doi:10.1117/12.875511; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.875511


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