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Proceedings Article

Uptake of PEGylated indocyanine green loaded nanocapsules by cells of reticuloendothelial system

[+] Author Affiliations
Baharak Bahmani, Sharad Gupta, Valentine Vullev, Bahman Anvari

Univ. of California, Riverside (USA)

Proc. SPIE 7910, Reporters, Markers, Dyes, Nanoparticles, and Molecular Probes for Biomedical Applications III, 79101C (March 09, 2011); doi:10.1117/12.875729
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From Conference Volume 7910

  • Reporters, Markers, Dyes, Nanoparticles, and Molecular Probes for Biomedical Applications III
  • Samuel Achilefu; Ramesh Raghavachari
  • San Francisco, California, USA | January 22, 2011

abstract

Optically active nanoparticles are widely pursued as exogenous chromophores in diagnostic imaging and phototherapeutic applications. However, the blood circulation time of nanoparticles remains limited due to the rapid clearance of the nanoparticles by reticuloendothelial system (RES). Coating with Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is a strategy to extend the circulation time of nanoparticles. Here, we report synthesis and cellular studies of polymeric-based nanocapsules loaded with Indocyanine green (ICG), an FDA approved near-infrared dye, and coated with PEG molecules of various molecular weights through reductive amination. We report the effect of PEG's molecular weight on the uptake of these nanocapsules by human spleen macrophages and hepatocytes using flow cytometry. Our results indicate that the phagocytic content of PEGylated nanocapsules in human spleen macrophages was reduced as compared to uncoated nanocapsules. Among PEGylated nanocapsules, low molecular weight (5000 Da) PEG-coated nanocapsules displayed lower intracellular uptake by spleen macrophages than high molecular weight (30,000 Da) PEG-coated nanocapsules for up to 90 minutes. Encapsulation within the polymeric nanocapsules reduced the hepatic content of ICG with normal human hepatocytes for up to two hours, while the molecular weight of PEG did not have a statistically significant effect on the content of the nanocapsules in liver cells. Our results suggest that reduced uptake of nanocapsules by RES cells can result in prolonged blood circulation time of these nanoconstructs.

© (2011) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Citation

Baharak Bahmani ; Sharad Gupta ; Valentine Vullev and Bahman Anvari
"Uptake of PEGylated indocyanine green loaded nanocapsules by cells of reticuloendothelial system", Proc. SPIE 7910, Reporters, Markers, Dyes, Nanoparticles, and Molecular Probes for Biomedical Applications III, 79101C (March 09, 2011); doi:10.1117/12.875729; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.875729


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