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Proceedings Article

Manipulation of silver nanoparticles in a droplet for label-free detection of biological molecules using surface-enhanced Raman scattering

[+] Author Affiliations
Mustafa Çulha, Mine Altunbek, Sercan Keskin, Deniz Saatçi

Yeditepe Univ. (Turkey)

Proc. SPIE 7911, Plasmonics in Biology and Medicine VIII, 791102 (February 04, 2011); doi:10.1117/12.871219
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From Conference Volume 7911

  • Plasmonics in Biology and Medicine VIII
  • Tuan Vo-Dinh; Joseph R. Lakowicz
  • San Francisco, California, USA | January 22, 2011

abstract

Detection and identification of biomacromolecules is of critical importance in many fields ranging from biotechnology to medicine. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is an emerging technique for the label-free detection and identification of biological molecules and structures with its fingerprinting properties and high sensitivity. However, there are a number of obstacles for its applications for biological macromolecules due to their complexity. In this report, manipulation of microscopic processes in play during the drying of a sessile droplet as a tool to influence the nanoparticle-macromolecule packing, which has dramatic effect on SERS performance, before the SERS acquisition is demonstrated. A process known as the coffee ring phenomenon jams all particles and molecular species to the edges of the droplet during drying. This uncontrolled process has dramatic effects on a SERS experiment, using colloidal metal nanoparticles as substrates, by sweeping everything to the edges and influencing the packing of nanoparticles in the droplet area. A plastic tip was dipped into a drying sample droplet to influence the uncontrolled piling up. A negatively-charged protein, BSA, a positively-charged protein, cytochrom c, and a 20-base long oligonucleotide, were used as model biomacromolecules in this study. While a minimum of one order of magnitude lower concentration improvement in detection limit was observed with negatively-charged biomacromolecules, no significant improvement was observed with positively-charged ones compared to a sample droplet left on the surface without any interference. With the demonstrated approach, picomolar-level biomolecular detection using SERS is possible.

© (2011) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Citation

Mustafa Çulha ; Mine Altunbek ; Sercan Keskin and Deniz Saatçi
"Manipulation of silver nanoparticles in a droplet for label-free detection of biological molecules using surface-enhanced Raman scattering", Proc. SPIE 7911, Plasmonics in Biology and Medicine VIII, 791102 (February 04, 2011); doi:10.1117/12.871219; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.871219


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