Full Content is available to subscribers

Subscribe/Learn More  >
Proceedings Article

Effects of spatial correlations and global precedence on the visual fidelity of distorted images

[+] Author Affiliations
Damon M. Chandler, Kenny H. Lim, Sheila S. Hemami

Cornell Univ.

Proc. SPIE 6057, Human Vision and Electronic Imaging XI, 60570F (February 03, 2006); doi:10.1117/12.655442
Text Size: A A A
From Conference Volume 6057

  • Human Vision and Electronic Imaging XI
  • Bernice E. Rogowitz; Thrasyvoulos N. Pappas; Scott J. Daly
  • San Jose, CA | January 15, 2006

abstract

This paper presents the results of three psychophysical experiments designed to investigate the effects of spatial correlations and the disruption of global precedence on the visual fidelity of natural images. The first two experiments used a psychophysical scaling paradigm in which subjects placed distorted images along a linear, one-dimensional "distortion axis" where physical distance corresponded to perceived distortion. In the first experiment, images were distorted at fixed levels of total distortion contrast in various fashions chosen to provide a reasonable representation of commonly encountered distortions. In the second experiment, images were simultaneously distorted with both structural distortion and additive white noise. Additionally, a third experiment was performed in which visual dissimilarities between all pairs of images were measured for the images used in second experiment. Results revealed that structural distortion generally gave rise to the greatest perceived distortion among the types of distortions tested; and, at highly suprathreshold distortion contrasts, additive white noise gave rise to the least perceived distortion. Furthermore, although structural distortion and noise appear to correspond to two separate perceptual dimensions, the addition of low-contrast white noise to an image which already contained structural distortion decreased the perceived distortion of the image, despite the increase in the total contrast of the distortions. These findings suggest that a measure of visual fidelity must take into account the spatial correlation between the distortions and the image, masking imposed by the images, the perceived contrast of the distortions, and the cross masking effects which occur between multiple types of distortions.

© (2006) COPYRIGHT SPIE--The International Society for Optical Engineering. Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

Topics

Distortion
Citation

Damon M. Chandler ; Kenny H. Lim and Sheila S. Hemami
"Effects of spatial correlations and global precedence on the visual fidelity of distorted images", Proc. SPIE 6057, Human Vision and Electronic Imaging XI, 60570F (February 03, 2006); doi:10.1117/12.655442; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.655442


Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this proceeding ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).

Figures

Tables

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this proceeding ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.