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Proceedings Article

Demonstrating the benefits of source-mask optimization and enabling technologies through experiment and simulations

[+] Author Affiliations
David Melville, Alan E. Rosenbluth, Saeed Bagheri, Phil Strenski, Andreas Waechter, Laszlo Ladanyi, Francisco Barahona, Daniele Scarpazza, Jon Lee, Alfred Wagner

IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Ctr. (USA)

Kehan Tian, Kafai Lai, Jaione Tirapu-Azpiroz, Jason Meiring, Daniel Corliss, Azalia Krasnoperova, Lei Zhuang

IBM Semiconductor Research and Development Ctr. (USA)

Scott Halle, Greg McIntyre

IBM Research at Albany Nanotech (USA)

Tom Faure, Emily Gallagher, Mike Hibbs

IBM Mask House (USA)

Tadanobu Inoue, Masaharu Sakamoto, Hidemasa Muta

IBM Research Tokyo (Japan)

Geoffrey Burr, Young Kim

IBM Almaden Research Ctr. (USA)

Alexander Tritchkov, Yuri Granik, Moutaz Fakhry, Kostas Adam, Gabriel Berger, Michael Lam, Aasutosh Dave, Nick Cobb

Mentor Graphics Corp. (USA)

Proc. SPIE 7640, Optical Microlithography XXIII, 764006 (March 16, 2010); doi:10.1117/12.846716
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From Conference Volume 7640

  • Optical Microlithography XXIII
  • Mircea V. Dusa; Will Conley
  • San Jose, California | February 21, 2010

abstract

In recent years the potential of Source-Mask Optimization (SMO) as an enabling technology for 22nm-and-beyond lithography has been explored and documented in the literature.1-5 It has been shown that intensive optimization of the fundamental degrees of freedom in the optical system allows for the creation of non-intuitive solutions in both the mask and the source, which leads to improved lithographic performance. These efforts have driven the need for improved controllability in illumination5-7 and have pushed the required optimization performance of mask design.8, 9 This paper will present recent experimental evidence of the performance advantage gained by intensive optimization, and enabling technologies like pixelated illumination. Controllable pixelated illumination opens up new regimes in control of proximity effects,1, 6, 7 and we will show corresponding examples of improved through-pitch performance in 22nm Resolution Enhancement Technique (RET). Simulation results will back-up the experimental results and detail the ability of SMO to drive exposure-count reduction, as well as a reduction in process variation due to critical factors such as Line Edge Roughness (LER), Mask Error Enhancement Factor (MEEF), and the Electromagnetic Field (EMF) effect. The benefits of running intensive optimization with both source and mask variables jointly has been previously discussed.1-3 This paper will build on these results by demonstrating large-scale jointly-optimized source/mask solutions and their impact on design-rule enumerated designs.

© (2010) COPYRIGHT SPIE--The International Society for Optical Engineering. Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Citation

David Melville ; Alan E. Rosenbluth ; Kehan Tian ; Kafai Lai ; Saeed Bagheri, et al.
"Demonstrating the benefits of source-mask optimization and enabling technologies through experiment and simulations", Proc. SPIE 7640, Optical Microlithography XXIII, 764006 (March 16, 2010); doi:10.1117/12.846716; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.846716


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