Full Content is available to subscribers

Subscribe/Learn More  >
Proceedings Article

Micromechanics models and innovative sensor technologies to evaluate internal-frost damage of concrete

[+] Author Affiliations
Qingli Dai, Kenny Ng, Jun Zhou

Michigan Technological Univ. (USA)

Xiong Yu

Case Western Reserve Univ. (USA)

Proc. SPIE 7983, Nondestructive Characterization for Composite Materials, Aerospace Engineering, Civil Infrastructure, and Homeland Security 2011, 798306 (April 15, 2011); doi:10.1117/12.880537
Text Size: A A A
From Conference Volume 7983

  • Nondestructive Characterization for Composite Materials, Aerospace Engineering, Civil Infrastructure, and Homeland Security 2011
  • San Diego, California, USA | March 06, 2011

abstract

Internal-frost damage is one of the major problems affecting the durability of concrete in cold regions. This paper presents micromechanics models and innovative sensor technologies to study the fundamental mechanisms of frost damage in concrete. The crystallization pressure due to ice nucleation with capillary pores is the primary cause of internal-frost damage of concrete. The crystallization pressure of a cylinder pore was formulated using interface energy balance with thermodynamics equations. The obtained crystallization pressure on the pore wall was input for the fracture simulation with the developed Extended Finite Element Model (XFEM). The XFEM fracture simulation on a homogeneous beam sample with a vertical cylinder pore leads to a straight line. The XFEM simulation was also conducted on the generated digital sample. The simulation results were favorable compared with the middle-notched single edge beam bending specimen due to the open-mode fracture behavior in both cases. An innovative Time-Domain Reflectometry (TDR) sensor was developed to nondestructively monitor the freezing process. The experimental data shows that the TDR sensor signals can detect the freezing degree, an important input parameter to micromechanics models. These studies indicate that the developed micromechanics models and TDR sensor techniques can be used by the practitioners to evaluate internal-frost damage of concrete. Future work will incorporate the TDR sensor measurements into micromechanics models to real-time predict the internal-frost damage process in concrete specimens. The predicted freeze-thaw damage process will be verified with acoustic emission detection.

© (2011) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Citation

Qingli Dai ; Xiong Yu ; Kenny Ng and Jun Zhou
"Micromechanics models and innovative sensor technologies to evaluate internal-frost damage of concrete", Proc. SPIE 7983, Nondestructive Characterization for Composite Materials, Aerospace Engineering, Civil Infrastructure, and Homeland Security 2011, 798306 (April 15, 2011); doi:10.1117/12.880537; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.880537


Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this proceeding ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).

Figures

Tables

NOTE:
Citing articles are presented as examples only. In non-demo SCM6 implementation, integration with CrossRef’s "Cited By" API will populate this tab (http://www.crossref.org/citedby.html).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this proceeding ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.