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Proceedings Article

Satellite-derived determination of PM10 concentration and of the associated risk on public health

[+] Author Affiliations
Dimosthenis Sarigiannis

European Commission Joint Research Ctr. (Belgium)

Nicolaos I. Sifakis

National Observatory of Athens (Greece)

Nikos Soulakellis

Univ. of the Aegean (Greece)

Maria Tombrou

Univ. of Athens (Greece)

Klaus P. Schaefer

Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

Proc. SPIE 5235, Remote Sensing of Clouds and the Atmosphere VIII, 408 (February 16, 2004); doi:10.1117/12.520450
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From Conference Volume 5235

  • Remote Sensing of Clouds and the Atmosphere VIII
  • Klaus Schaefer; Adolfo Comeron; Michel R. Carleer; Richard H. Picard
  • Barcelona, Spain | September 08, 2003

abstract

Recent studies worldwide have revealed the relation between urban air pollution, particularly fine aerosols, and human health. The current state of the art in air quality assessment, monitoring and management comprises analytical measurements and atmospheric transport modeling. Earth observation from satellites provides an additional information layer through the calculation of synoptic air pollution indicators, such as atmospheric turbidity. Fusion of these data sources with ancillary data, including classification of population vulnerability to the adverse health effects of fine particulate and, especially, PM10 pollution, in the ambient air, integrates them into an optimally managed environmental information processing tool. Several algorithms pertaining to urban air pollution assessment using HSR satellite imagery have been developed and applied to urban sites in Europe such as Athens, Greece, the Po valley in Northern Italy, and Munich, Germany. Implementing these computational procedures on moderate spatial resolution (MSR) satellite data and coupling the result with the output of HSR data processing provides comprehensive and dynamic information on the spatial distribution of PM10 concentration. The result of EO data processing is corrected to account for the relative importance of the signal due to anthropogenic fine particles, concentrated in the lower troposphere. Fusing the corrected maps of PM10 concentration with data on vulnerable population distribution and implementation of epidemiology-derived exposure-response relationships results in the calculation of indices of the public health risk from PM10 concentration in the ambient air. Results from the pilot application of this technique for integrated environmental and health assessment in the urban environment are given.

© (2004) COPYRIGHT SPIE--The International Society for Optical Engineering. Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Citation

Dimosthenis Sarigiannis ; Nicolaos I. Sifakis ; Nikos Soulakellis ; Maria Tombrou and Klaus P. Schaefer
"Satellite-derived determination of PM10 concentration and of the associated risk on public health", Proc. SPIE 5235, Remote Sensing of Clouds and the Atmosphere VIII, 408 (February 16, 2004); doi:10.1117/12.520450; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.520450


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