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Proceedings Article

Autostereoscopic desktop display: an evolution of technology

[+] Author Affiliations
Joshua M. Cobb

Eastman Kodak Co. (USA)

Proc. SPIE 5664, Stereoscopic Displays and Virtual Reality Systems XII, 139 (June 14, 2005); doi:10.1117/12.585053
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From Conference Volume 5664

  • Stereoscopic Displays and Virtual Reality Systems XII
  • Andrew J. Woods; Mark T. Bolas; John O. Merritt; Ian E. McDowall
  • San Jose, CA | January 17, 2005

abstract

A new technology for creating a large stereoscopic image has been developed and has evolved over several years. The optical apparatus for creating a large, distortion-free image has changed from a bulky, immersive viewing system to a display that can sit on a desktop and creates a comfortable stereo image that can be viewed for long periods of time without eyestrain. The central idea of creating the images with a monocentric optical system has remained constant; however, the application of monocentricity has changed over several designs. A monocentric design is one where multiple spherical optical surfaces share the same center of curvature. The advantage of this type of system is that it allows the image quality to be corrected over a very wide field of view with a large pupil. The first system was presented at the Stereoscopic Displays and Applications Conference in 2003. This system was based upon custom digital projectors creating images on two curved diffusers, which were then imaged by a ball lens. The final collimation of the images was done with a 36-inch radius mirror. This system was designed as proof of a concept for the technology, and it was not practical to market it as a product solution. This led to a desktop solution that utilized twin LCD displays with monocentric imaging engines that had separate collimating mirrors. There were various improvements to this configuration that ultimately resulted in a high-resolution, bright, low-distortion stereo image. After a brief review of the previous technology, the various embodiments of the desktop display will be discussed.

© (2005) COPYRIGHT SPIE--The International Society for Optical Engineering. Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Citation

Joshua M. Cobb
"Autostereoscopic desktop display: an evolution of technology", Proc. SPIE 5664, Stereoscopic Displays and Virtual Reality Systems XII, 139 (June 14, 2005); doi:10.1117/12.585053; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.585053


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