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Proceedings Article

HOTEYE: a novel thermal camera using higher operating temperature infrared detectors

[+] Author Affiliations
Gavin J. Bowen, Ian D. Blenkinsop, Neil T. Gordon, Mark A. C. Harper, Paul C. Haynes, Colin J. Hollier, David J. Lees, Daniel Milner, Tim S. Philips, Richard W. Price, Paul Southern

QinetiQ (United Kingdom)

Rose Catchpole, Les Hipwood, Chris Jones, Chris D. Maxey, Mike Ordish, Chris Shaw

BAE SYSTEMS Infra-Red (United Kingdom)

Proc. SPIE 5783, Infrared Technology and Applications XXXI, 392 (June 03, 2005); doi:10.1117/12.603305
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From Conference Volume 5783

  • Infrared Technology and Applications XXXI
  • Bjorn F. Andresen; Gabor F. Fulop
  • Orlando, Florida, USA | March 28, 2005

abstract

Conventional high performance infrared (IR) sensors need to be cooled to around 80K in order to achieve a high level of thermal sensitivity. Cooling to this temperature requires the use of Joule-Thomson coolers (with bottled gas supply) or Stirling cycle cooling engines, both of which are bulky, expensive and can have low reliability. In contrast to this, higher operating temperature (HOT) detectors are designed to give high thermal performance at an operating temperature in the range 200K to 240K. These detectors are fabricated from multi-layer mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) structures that have been designed for this application. At higher temperatures, lower cost, smaller, lighter and more reliable thermoelectric (or Peltier) devices can be used to cool the detectors. The HOTEYE thermal imaging camera, which is based on a 320x256 pixel HOT focal plane array, is described in this paper and performance measurements reported.

© (2005) COPYRIGHT SPIE--The International Society for Optical Engineering. Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Citation

Gavin J. Bowen ; Ian D. Blenkinsop ; Rose Catchpole ; Neil T. Gordon ; Mark A. C. Harper, et al.
"HOTEYE: a novel thermal camera using higher operating temperature infrared detectors", Proc. SPIE 5783, Infrared Technology and Applications XXXI, 392 (June 03, 2005); doi:10.1117/12.603305; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.603305


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