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Proceedings Article

Discussion of human resonant frequency

[+] Author Affiliations
James M. W. Brownjohn, Xiahua Zheng

Nanyang Technological Univ. (Singapore)

Proc. SPIE 4317, Second International Conference on Experimental Mechanics, 469 (June 13, 2001); doi:10.1117/12.429621
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From Conference Volume 4317

  • Second International Conference on Experimental Mechanics
  • Fook S. Chau; Chenggen Quan
  • Singapore, Singapore | November 29, 2000

abstract

Human bodies are often exposed to vertical vibrations when they are in the workplace or on vehicles. Prolonged exposure may cause undue stress and discomfort in the human body especially at its resonant frequency. By testing the response of the human body on a vibrating platform, many researchers found the human whole-body fundamental resonant frequency to be around 5 Hz. However, in recent years, an indirect method has been prosed which appears to increase the resonant frequency to approximately 10 Hz. To explain this discrepancy, experimental work was carried out in NTU. The study shows that the discrepancy lies in the vibration magnitude used in the tests. A definition of human natural frequency in terms of vibration magnitude is proposed.

© (2001) COPYRIGHT SPIE--The International Society for Optical Engineering. Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Citation

James M. W. Brownjohn and Xiahua Zheng
"Discussion of human resonant frequency", Proc. SPIE 4317, Second International Conference on Experimental Mechanics, 469 (June 13, 2001); doi:10.1117/12.429621; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.429621


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