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Proceedings Article

Autostereoscopic video display with motion parallax

[+] Author Affiliations
Stephen P. Hines

HinesLab, Inc. (USA)

Proc. SPIE 3012, Stereoscopic Displays and Virtual Reality Systems IV, 208 (May 15, 1997); doi:10.1117/12.274459
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From Conference Volume 3012

  • Stereoscopic Displays and Virtual Reality Systems IV
  • Scott S. Fisher; John O. Merritt; Mark T. Bolas
  • San Jose, CA | February 08, 1997

abstract

Described, is the HinesLab '3DTV,' a 3-dimensional video display which provides true stereo 3-D images, without glasses. Multiple viewers can move in front of the display, seeing true stereo images with motion parallax. Applications include 3-D video arcade games, avionics, engineering workstations, scientific visualization, video phones, and 3-D television. The display is built around a single liquid crystal panel, on which multiple images are projected to a screen where they form the 3-D image. The relationships of objects are confirmed in three dimensional space as the viewer moves through the viewing positions. The HinesLab autostereoscopic technology is transparent to the user. The 3DTV display can be produced economically because it uses a single display panel and conventional optics. The primary advantage of this technique is its simplicity. CGI images are supplied to the monitor with a single video board. Three- dimensional television can be broadcast by a single unmodified television station (NTSC, PAL, SECAM, HDTV, etc.), and recorded and replayed in 3-D with a VCR. From 4 - 21 eye positions can be created, with a range of resolution and viewing angles, limited only by currently available liquid- crystal display technology.

© (1997) COPYRIGHT SPIE--The International Society for Optical Engineering. Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
Citation

Stephen P. Hines
"Autostereoscopic video display with motion parallax", Proc. SPIE 3012, Stereoscopic Displays and Virtual Reality Systems IV, 208 (May 15, 1997); doi:10.1117/12.274459; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.274459


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